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Legal News
31 Jul 2013
by Andrew Morgan

[JURIST announcement] We are proud to announce the release of a new JURIST endeavor: the JURIST Podcast. On a monthly basis, our editors, contributors, professional staff and other friends of JURIST will get together to discuss the issues of the day. We hope that the podcast will allow us to … [read more]


30 Jul 2013
by Andrew Morgan

In the first edition of the JURIST Podcast, the panel discuss the National Security Agency, Edward Snowden and security updates in the Texas Capitol. … [read more]


21 Jul 2013
by Andrew Morgan

Guantanamo Bay was leased to the US by Cuba on February 23, 1903, as part of the Cuban-American Treaty. Although the US had maintained a military presence at Guantanamo Bay since the Spanish-American War, the perpetual lease has allowed the US military to construct a permanent naval base on the … [read more]


21 Jul 2013
by Andrew Morgan

The right to vote has been a contentious issue in the US since the inception of the country. There was no specific right to vote or qualifications to vote drafted into the US Constitution. Each state was left to develop individual standards on how to run their voting and election … [read more]


21 Jul 2013
by Andrew Morgan

The financing of national and state elections has been a political topic in the US since the early nineteenth century. In 1828, then-candidate for the US presidency Andrew Jackson was one of the first politicians to create a campaign committee to help him raise money, secure votes, organize rallies and … [read more]


21 Jul 2013
by Andrew Morgan

This feature has been updated, as of June 6, 2014. Please refer to State Bans on Affirmative Action for the most recent information. On June 4, 1965, US President Lyndon B. Johnson delivered a commencement address at Howard University in Washington, DC, that applauded efforts by the federal government to … [read more]


21 Jul 2013
by Andrew Morgan

While the Syrian conflict began during the Arab Spring of 2011, it was fueled by decades of political oppression. On March 6, 2011, schoolchildren, inspired by uprisings in Egypt and Libya, graffitied anti-Bashir al-Assad messages on several buildings in Daraa. After Syrian police arrested the children, protests erupted in Daraa … [read more]


21 Jul 2013
by Andrew Morgan

The heated debate over same-sex marriage is one of the most polarizing issues currently facing the American legal community. It is a controversy being played out in every branch of the federal government, from the floor of the US Senate to the Oval Office. It has raised concerns over the … [read more]


21 Jul 2013
by Andrew Morgan

The continuing legal controversy over reproductive rights has embroiled the US legal system for decades. Since the US Supreme Court's landmark decision in Roe v. Wade, regulating abortion services has been a major target of legislation in Congress and in every state legislature. Despite numerous Supreme Court decisions and countless … [read more]


21 Jul 2013
by Andrew Morgan

On April 25, 2012, the US Supreme Court heard oral arguments in the case of Arizona v. United States. On June 25, 2012, the Court decided the legal fate of Arizona's highly controversial immigration laws, more commonly referred to as SB 1070. The Court ruled that three sections of the … [read more]


21 Jul 2013
by Andrew Morgan

Slavery was a socially accepted and promoted practice in Greek and Roman antiquity and in Eastern empires. The modern practice of human trafficking is another iteration in the history of the international slave trade. An intricate global network connected traders in Africa to merchants in emerging European countries, as well … [read more]


21 Jul 2013
by Andrew Morgan

Fracking, or hydraulic fracturing, has been at the center of much debate in the past decade. The process has had an enormous impact on the energy industry in the US, particularly with regard to natural gas markets. Natural gas will continue to play an important role in the energy future … [read more]


20 Jul 2013
by Andrew Morgan

Although the ICC's name implies exclusivity, it is one of many international criminal tribunals. Several permanent international tribunals dealing in civil matters have also developed, ranging from the Permanent Court of Arbitration to the International Tribunal for the Law of the Sea to the World Trade Organization's Dispute Settlement Body. … [read more]


20 Jul 2013
by Andrew Morgan

The Libya Conflict developed from long-standing sectarian rivalries in the country, which resulted in an armed clash between autocrat Colonel Muammar Gaddafi's supporters and those seeking to oust him from power. In a bid to end the unrest, Gaddafi's son, Saif al-Islam, gave a televised address in which he announced … [read more]


20 Jul 2013
by Andrew Morgan

Of the 139 states that signed the Rome Statute, 32 have not yet ratified the treaty. According to the Vienna Convention on the Law of Treaties [PDF], a state that has signed but not ratified a treaty is obliged to refrain from "acts which would defeat the object and purpose" … [read more]


20 Jul 2013
by Andrew Morgan

Articles 5 through 20 of the Rome Statute govern the jurisdiction of the ICC. There are four major factors to consider when assessing the court's jurisdiction. First, the specific crime committed has to fit the definition of one of the four crimes outlined in the statute. Second, the court must … [read more]


20 Jul 2013
by Andrew Morgan

The establishment of the ICC by the UN is the final product of fifty years of work aimed at developing an international judicial body with the capability of adjudicating cases of genocide and crimes against humanity. The efforts to create such a body began in 1872 with Hustav Moynier, one … [read more]


20 Jul 2013
by Andrew Morgan

Since its inception in July 2002, the International Criminal Court (ICC) has become a dominant organization in international relations and the premiere tribunal for the prosecution of war crimes. Despite being founded only a decade ago, the ICC has already investigated atrocities in countries including the Democratic Republic of Congo, … [read more]


20 Jul 2013
by Andrew Morgan

Since its inception in July 2002, the International Criminal Court (ICC) has become a dominant organization in international relations and the premiere tribunal for the prosecution of war crimes. Despite being founded only a decade ago, the ICC has already investigated and prosecuted atrocities in countries including the Democratic Republic … [read more]


20 Jul 2013
by Andrew Morgan

Following international intervention and several months of stalemate, opposition forces seized control of Tripoli, the Libyan capital, and took two of Gaddafi's sons into custody on August 22, 2011. Opposition forces continued to clash with the remaining loyalist forces until October 2011, sparking fierce combat over the last strongholds of … [read more]


20 Jul 2013
by Andrew Morgan

The US military was in strategic command of the international effort in Libya at first, with the launch of Operation Odyssey Dawn on March 19, 2011. Operation Odyssey Dawn officially ended on March 31, with the US handing over control of the effort to NATO. According to opponents of US … [read more]


20 Jul 2013
by Andrew Morgan

Following weeks of escalating violence, the international community began to consider action against Gaddafi's government. The UN Security Council voted unanimously on February 27, 2011 to adopt Resolution 1970, imposing sanctions on Gaddafi's government, including an arms embargo, travel ban and the freezing of assets. The resolution also referred the … [read more]


20 Jul 2013
by Andrew Morgan

font size='3'>The conflict in Libya arose out of protests beginning February 15, 2011, in the eastern city of Benghazi. The protest came as part of a wider protest movement, popularly referred to as the Arab Spring, that spread throughout the Middle East and North Africa. The Arab Spring came to … [read more]


20 Jul 2013
by Andrew Morgan

The conflict in Libya arose out of protests beginning February 15, 2011, in the eastern city of Benghazi. The protest came as part of a wider protest movement that had spread throughout the Middle East and North Africa. On February 23, Benghazi fell under the control of protesters after the … [read more]


20 Jul 2013
by Andrew Morgan

Egypt has been sharply criticized by international organizations such as Amnesty International (AI) and HRW for its poor state of human rights before, during and after the 2011 revolution. Protestors demanded the overthrow of Mubarak for grievances related to police brutality, state of emergency laws, lack of free elections, freedom … [read more]

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