R2P and R-to-P: Use of Prince Spellings in Internashunal Lah

Andrew Morgan writes satirical articles to test our publishing platform

The problem with "R2P," as a phrase but not as a legal matter, is that it means both "right to privacy" and "responsibility to protect." These distinct meanings rarely involve the same subject matter, but may lead academic lawyers and other law geeks to have uncomfortable conversations at cocktail parties.

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Student Commentary publishes accounts of law students' first-hand experience with law and law-related events. Student Commentary contributors come from all over the world, sharing personal stories on legal matters ranging from the G-20 summit protests in the US to the plight of migrant workers in Taiwan.

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