Proposed Establishment of the Champlain Valley of New York Viticultural Area

Issued by Treasury Department
on Thursday 2 July 2015
Comments closed on 2015-08-31

Full text

SUMMARY: The Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau (TTB) proposes to 
establish the ``Champlain Valley of New York'' viticultural area in 
Clinton and Essex Counties, New York. The proposed viticultural area 
does not lie within or contain any established viticultural area. TTB 
designates viticultural areas to allow vintners to better describe the 
origin of their wines and to allow consumers to better identify wines 
they may purchase. TTB invites comments on this proposed addition to 
its regulations.

DATES: Comments must be received by August 31, 2015.

ADDRESSES: Please send your comments on this notice to one of the 
following addresses:
    <bullet> Internet: <a href="http://www.regulations.gov">http://www.regulations.gov</a> (via the online 
comment form for this notice as posted within Docket No. TTB-2015-0010 
at ``<a href="http://Regulations.gov">Regulations.gov</a>,'' the Federal e-rulemaking portal);
    <bullet> U.S. Mail: Director, Regulations and Rulings Division, 
Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau, 1310 G Street NW., Box 12, 
Washington, DC 20005; or
    <bullet> Hand delivery/courier in lieu of mail: Alcohol and Tobacco 
Tax and Trade Bureau, 1310 G Street NW., Suite 400, Washington, DC 
20005.
    See the Public Participation section of this notice for specific 
instructions and requirements for submitting comments, and for 
information on how to request a public hearing or view or obtain copies 
of the petition and supporting materials.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Karen A. Thornton, Regulations and 
Rulings Division, Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau, 1310 G 
Street NW., Box 12, Washington, DC 20005; phone 202-453-1039, ext. 175.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:

Background on Viticultural Areas

TTB Authority

    Section 105(e) of the Federal Alcohol Administration Act (FAA Act), 
27 U.S.C. 205(e), authorizes the Secretary of the Treasury to prescribe 
regulations for the labeling of wine, distilled spirits, and malt 
beverages. The FAA Act provides that these regulations should, among 
other things, prohibit consumer deception and the use of misleading 
statements on labels and ensure that labels provide the consumer with 
adequate information as to the identity and quality of the product. The 
Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau (TTB) administers the FAA Act 
pursuant to section 1111(d) of the Homeland Security Act of 2002, 
codified at 6 U.S.C. 531(d). The Secretary has delegated various 
authorities through Treasury Department Order 120-01, dated December 
10, 2013, to the TTB Administrator to perform the functions and duties 
in the administration and enforcement of this law.
    Part 4 of the TTB regulations (27 CFR part 4) authorizes TTB to 
establish definitive viticultural areas and regulate the use of their 
names as appellations of origin on wine labels and in wine 
advertisements. Part 9 of the TTB regulations (27 CFR part 9) sets 
forth the standards for the preparation and submission to TTB of 
petitions for the establishment or modification of American 
viticultural areas (AVAs) and lists the approved American viticultural 
areas.

Definition

    Section 4.25(e)(1)(i) of the TTB regulations (27 CFR 4.25(e)(1)(i)) 
defines a viticultural area for American wine as a delimited grape-
growing region having distinguishing features, as described in part 9 
of the regulations, and a name and a delineated boundary, as 
established in part 9 of the regulations. These designations allow 
vintners and consumers to attribute a given quality, reputation, or 
other characteristic of a wine made from grapes grown in an area to the 
wine's geographic origin. The establishment of AVAs allows vintners to describe more accurately the 
origin of their wines to consumers and helps consumers to identify 
wines they may purchase. Establishment of an AVA is neither an approval 
nor an endorsement by TTB of the wine produced in that area.

Requirements

    Section 4.25(e)(2) of the TTB regulations (27 CFR 4.25(e)(2)) 
outlines the procedure for proposing an AVA and provides that any 
interested party may petition TTB to establish a grape-growing region 
as a viticultural area. Section 9.12 of the TTB regulations (27 CFR 
9.12) prescribes the standards for petitions for the establishment or 
modification of AVAs. Petitions to establish an AVA must include the 
following:
    <bullet> Evidence that the area within the proposed AVA boundary is 
nationally or locally known by the viticultural area name specified in 
the petition;
    <bullet> An explanation of the basis for defining the boundary of 
the proposed AVA;
    <bullet> A narrative description of the features of the proposed 
AVA affecting viticulture, such as climate, geology, soils, physical 
features, and elevation, that make the proposed AVA distinctive and 
distinguish it from adjacent areas outside the proposed boundary;
    <bullet> The appropriate United States Geological Survey (USGS) 
map(s) showing the location of the proposed AVA, with the boundary of 
the proposed AVA clearly drawn thereon; and
    <bullet> A detailed narrative description of the proposed AVA 
boundary based on USGS map markings.

Champlain Valley of New York Petition

    TTB received a petition from Colin Read, owner of North Star 
Vineyard, on behalf of the Lake Champlain Grape Growers Association, 
proposing the establishment of the ``Champlain Valley of New York'' 
AVA. The proposed AVA is located within a long, narrow valley on the 
western shore of Lake Champlain and is approximately 82 miles long and 
approximately 20 miles wide at its widest point. The proposed AVA 
encompasses approximately 500 square miles and has 6 bonded wineries, 
as well as 11 commercial vineyards covering a total of approximately 
15.47 acres distributed throughout the proposed AVA. The petition notes 
that there are an additional 63 acres of vineyards planned for planting 
within the proposed AVA in the next few years.
    According to the petition, the distinguishing feature of the 
proposed Champlain Valley of New York AVA is its short growing season, 
which is conducive to growing cold-hardy North American hybrid 
varieties of grapes (such as Frontenac, La Crescent, and Marquette) but 
not Vitis vinifera (V. vinifera) grapes. The petition also included 
descriptions of the precipitation, topography, soils, and geology of 
the proposed AVA. However, the petition did not discuss the 
viticultural significance of these features or provide data from the 
surrounding regions for contrast. Therefore, TTB does not consider them 
to be distinguishing features of the proposed AVA, and they are not 
discussed in this proposed rule. Unless otherwise noted, all 
information and data pertaining to the proposed AVA contained in this 
document are from the petition for the proposed Champlain Valley of New 
York AVA and its supporting exhibits.

Name Evidence

    The proposed Champlain Valley of New York AVA derives its name from 
Lake Champlain, which lies on the border between New York and the State 
of Vermont and extends north into the Canadian Province of Quebec. 
According to the petition, the long, narrow valley surrounding the lake 
has been known as the Champlain Valley since the region was explored 
and settled by French and English explorers. Because the name 
``Champlain Valley'' also applies to the portions of the valley that 
are in Vermont and Canada, the petitioner proposed the name ``Champlain 
Valley of New York'' to more accurately describe the location of the 
proposed AVA.
    Federal and State agencies and departments currently refer to the 
region of the proposed AVA as the ``Champlain Valley.'' In 2005, 
Congress designated Lake Champlain and Lake George, which is 
immediately to the south of Lake Champlain, as a single National 
Heritage Area formally known as the Champlain Valley National Heritage 
Partnership (CVNHP). The purpose of the CVNHP is ``to promote the 
Champlain Valley's natural and cultural treasures.'' \1\ The Champlain 
Valley International Wine Trail was created in 2012 as part of the 
CVNHP to promote the wineries and vineyards along the lake in Canada, 
New York, and Vermont and allows visitors ``to learn about the 
tremendous offering of vineyards and wineries in the unique terroir of 
the Champlain Valley.'' \2\ The USDA soil survey for Clinton and Essex 
Counties, where the proposed AVA is located, designates the region of 
the proposed AVA as ``Champlain Valley.'' Finally, the Essex County 
Public Health Department published a map of hiking trails and 
recreational areas in the region of the proposed AVA titled ``The 
Adirondack Park: Champlain Valley Region.''
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    \1\ <a href="http://www.champlainvalleynhp.org/index.htm">www.champlainvalleynhp.org/index.htm</a>.
    \2\ <a href="http://www.lcbp.org/2012/11/champlain-international-wine-trail-announced">www.lcbp.org/2012/11/champlain-international-wine-trail-announced</a>.
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    The petition also included names of businesses and organizations 
throughout the proposed AVA that include ``Champlain Valley'' in their 
names. Examples from Plattsburg, located at the northern end of the 
proposed AVA, include the Champlain Valley Transportation Museum, 
Champlain Valley Physicians Hospital, and Champlain Valley Educational 
Services. Examples from Ticonderoga, at the southern end of the 
proposed AVA, include Champlain Valley Heating and Plumbing, Champlain 
Valley Chiropractic Service, and the Champlain Valley Services 
landscaping company.

Boundary Evidence

    The proposed Champlain Valley of New York AVA consists of a long, 
narrow, relatively flat valley located along the western shore of Lake 
Champlain in Clinton and Essex Counties, New York. The north-south 
oriented valley roughly corresponds to the region of New York that was 
once covered by Lake Vermont, an ancient glacial lake that covered the 
region approximately 12,000 years ago and was a precursor to Lake 
Champlain. The proposed AVA encompasses approximately 500 square miles. 
It stretches approximately 82 miles from the U.S.-Canada border to 
Ticonderoga, New York, at the southern tip of Lake Champlain. The width 
of the proposed AVA ranges from approximately 20 miles across at it 
widest point, which is along the U.S.-Canada border, to less than 5 
miles wide at its narrowest point, which is the land between State 
Highway 22 and the shore of Lake Champlain south of Port Henry, New 
York.
    The northern boundary of the proposed Champlain Valley of New York 
AVA follows the U.S.-Canada border. The eastern boundary follows the 
western shoreline of Lake Champlain. To the east of both Lake Champlain 
and the proposed AVA is the Vermont side of the Champlain Valley, which 
has physical features similar to those of the New York side, but has a 
longer growing season. The southern boundary of the proposed AVA 
follows the Champlain-Hudson Divide, which separates the Champlain 
Valley from the Hudson River Valley. The western boundary follows a series of creeks and roads and separates the valley 
of the proposed AVA from the foothills of the Adirondack Mountains.

Distinguishing Feature

    The distinguishing feature of the proposed Champlain Valley of New 
York AVA is a short growing season that is suitable for growing North 
American hybrid varieties of grapes but is too short for reliable 
cultivation of V. vinifera grapes. Although the proposed AVA extends 
approximately 82 miles from the U.S.-Canada border to the southern tip 
of Lake Champlain, temperatures within the proposed AVA are relatively 
uniform. The following table, derived from data included in the 
petition, lists the monthly maximum, minimum, and mean temperatures for 
four communities within the proposed AVA: Ticonderoga, located at the 
southernmost point of the proposed AVA; Peru, located approximately 50 
miles north of Ticonderoga, in the middle of the proposed AVA; 
Plattsburgh, located approximately 10 miles north of Peru; and Chazy, 
located approximately 14 miles north of Plattsburgh and approximately 8 
miles south of the U.S.-Canada border.
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    \3\ Source: National Climate Data Center, <a href="http://cdo.ncdc.noaa.gov/climatenormals/clim20/ny">http://cdo.ncdc.noaa.gov/climatenormals/clim20/ny</a>. Data is from monthly 
climate normals gathered by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric 
Administration from 1971-2000. Climate normal are gathered in 30-
year increments. At the time the petition was submitted, the 1971-
2000 climate normal was the most recent climate normal available for 
the region.

                                               Average Daily Maximum, Minimum, and Mean Temperatures (Degrees Fahrenheit) Within Proposed AVA \3\
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                                                             Month
                          Location                           -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                 Jan.       Feb.       Mar.       Apr.       May        June       July       Aug.       Sep.       Oct.       Nov.       Dec.
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                           Ticonderoga
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Maximum.....................................................       29.5       29.3       40.8       53.5         68       75.7       82.1       78.2         72       59.2       44.7       32.7
Minimum.....................................................         10        8.8       22.4       33.6         46       54.5         61       57.9       50.8         40       29.5       15.9
Mean........................................................       19.8         19       31.6       43.6         57       65.1       71.5         68       61.4       49.6       37.2       24.2
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                              Peru
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Maximum.....................................................       28.1       31.1       40.9       55.1       68.3       77.4       81.8       79.6         71       59.1       45.8       32.7
Minimum.....................................................        7.9       10.2       20.6       32.5       43.5       53.2       57.7       55.6       47.7       37.2       28.1         15
Mean........................................................         18       20.7       30.7       43.8       55.9       65.2       69.7       67.6       59.3       48.1       36.9       23.9
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                                                                                           Plattsburgh
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Maximum.....................................................       27.9       29.1       39.8       54.1       67.2       76.7       81.4       78.4       70.4       58.8         45       32.2
Minimum.....................................................          9        9.4       21.1         34       44.5       54.2       59.4       57.3       49.9       39.1       29.5       15.5
Mean........................................................       18.5       19.2       30.4         44       55.9       65.4       70.4       67.8       60.2         49       37.2       23.9
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                              Chazy
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Maximum.....................................................       26.9       28.4         39         54       67.5       76.3       80.9       78.7       70.3       58.3       44.6       31.3
Minimum.....................................................        7.1          8       19.8         33       44.1       53.7       58.9       56.6       48.7       38.6       28.6       14.3
Mean........................................................         17       18.1       29.4       43.5       55.8       64.9       69.9       67.7       59.5       48.4       36.6       22.8
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Because of the cool climate, the proposed AVA has a shorter growing 
season when compared to most of the surrounding regions. The following 
table, which was derived from information included in the petition, 
compares the probability of the last spring frost and the first fall 
frost within the proposed AVA and the surrounding regions. Peru, New 
York, was chosen as the representative location within the proposed AVA 
because of its central location. The two locations east of the proposed 
AVA are both located in Vermont: South Hero, which is located on Grand 
Isle in the middle of Lake Champlain, and Burlington, which is located 
on the eastern shore of Lake Champlain southeast of South Hero. 
Whitehall, New York, is located south of the proposed AVA, in the 
Hudson River Valley. Lake Placid is located approximately 40 miles west 
of Peru, within the Adirondack Mountains. Comparison data was not 
provided for the region to the north of the proposed AVA because the 
land is within Canada and is therefore ineligible for inclusion within 
an AVA.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \4\ Sources: 1971-2000 climate normal from <a href="http://cdo.ncdc.noaa.gov/climatenormals/clim20supp1/states/VT.pdf">http://cdo.ncdc.noaa.gov/climatenormals/clim20supp1/states/VT.pdf</a> and 
<a href="http://cdo.ncdc.noaa.gov/climatenormals/clim20supp1/states/NY.pdf">http://cdo.ncdc.noaa.gov/climatenormals/clim20supp1/states/NY.pdf</a>. 
The baseline temperature for frost is considered to be 32 degrees 
Fahrenheit.
    \5\ The date at which there is a 10 percent probability of the 
last spring frost occurring later.
    \6\ The date at which there is a 10 percent probability of the 
first fall frost occurring earlier.
    \7\ The probability level that the growing season will be longer 
is 10 percent.

                                  Comparison of Annual Frost Probabilities \4\
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                                  Growing season
 Location (direction from proposed AVA)   Last spring frost date \5\   First fall frost date \6\   length (days)
                                                                                                        \7\
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Peru, NY (within).......................  May 25....................  September 21..............             159
Whitehall, NY (south)...................  May 11....................  September 24..............             173
Lake Placid, NY (west)..................  June 22...................  August 30.................             116
South Hero, VT (east)...................  May 9.....................  September 27..............             183
Burlington, VT airport (east)...........  April 26..................  September 23..............             164
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- The data shows that the proposed AVA has a later last-frost date, 
an earlier first-frost date, and a shorter growing season than the 
surrounding regions to the north, east, and south. The region east of 
the proposed AVA has a longer growing season due to the presence of 
Lake Champlain. According to the petition, as air moves eastward over 
the lake, it warms and increases in humidity. The warm, humid air 
reduces the risk of frost and contributes to a longer growing season on 
the Vermont side of the lake. Even though the lake is narrow, its 
moderating effect on surrounding temperatures is significant. The 
petition notes that South Hero, located on an island in Lake Champlain, 
is only one mile east of Peru, yet its growing season is almost 4 weeks 
longer than that of the proposed AVA.
    The region to the south of the proposed Champlain Valley of New 
York AVA also has a longer growing season. The growing season in 
Whitehall, within the Hudson River Valley, is two weeks longer than 
that of the proposed AVA. The petition attributes the longer growing 
season to the warm, moist winds that flow upward along the Hudson River 
and the Mohawk Valley. These winds are blocked from entering the 
proposed AVA by the Champlain-Hudson Divide, which is the slight ridge 
that separates the two valley systems.
    To the west of the proposed AVA, in Lake Placid within the 
Adirondack Mountains, the higher elevations bring colder temperatures 
and a growing season that is much shorter than that of the proposed 
AVA. According to the petition, the growing season within the 
Adirondack Mountains is too short for the commercial cultivation of 
grapes.
    Because of the short growing season within the proposed Champlain 
Valley of New York AVA, V. vinifera grapes do not ripen reliably, so 
vineyard owners primarily grow cold-hardy North American hybrids. By 
contrast, V. vinifera grapes are commonly grown in the Vermont portion 
of the Champlain Valley, in the Hudson River Valley, and in the Upper 
Mohawk Valley near Lake Ontario.

TTB Determination

    TTB concludes that the petition to establish the Champlain Valley 
of New York viticultural area merits consideration and public comment, 
as invited in this notice of proposed rulemaking.

Boundary Description

    See the narrative description of the boundary of the petitioned-for 
viticultural area in the proposed regulatory text published at the end 
of this proposed rule.

Maps

    The petitioner provided the required maps, and they are listed 
below in the proposed regulatory text.

Impact on Current Wine Labels

    Part 4 of the TTB regulations prohibits any label reference on a 
wine that indicates or implies an origin other than the wine's true 
place of origin. For a wine to be labeled with a viticultural area 
name, at least 85 percent of the wine must be derived from grapes grown 
within the area represented by that name, and the wine must meet the 
other conditions listed in Sec.  4.25(e)(3) of the TTB regulations (27 
CFR 4.25(e)(3)). If the wine is not eligible for labeling with a 
viticultural area name and that name appears in the brand name, then 
the label is not in compliance and the bottler must change the brand 
name and obtain approval of a new label. Similarly, if the viticultural 
area name appears in another reference on the label in a misleading 
manner, the bottler would have to obtain approval of a new label. 
Different rules apply if a wine has a brand name containing a 
viticultural area name that was used as a brand name on a label 
approved before July 7, 1986. See Sec.  4.39(i)(2) of the TTB 
regulations (27 CFR 4.39(i)(2)) for details.
    If TTB establishes this proposed viticultural area, its name, 
``Champlain Valley of New York,'' will be recognized as a name of 
viticultural significance under Sec.  4.39(i)(3) of the TTB regulations 
(27 CFR 4.39(i)(3)). The text of the proposed regulation clarifies this 
point. Consequently, wine bottlers using the name ``Champlain Valley of 
New York'' in a brand name, including a trademark, or in another label 
reference as to the origin of the wine, would have to ensure that the 
product is eligible to use the viticultural name as an appellation of 
origin if this proposed rule is adopted as a final rule.
    TTB does not believe that ``Champlain Valley,'' standing alone, 
should have viticultural significance if the proposed viticultural area 
is established, due to the fact that the feature known as the Champlain 
Valley extends into Vermont. Accordingly, the proposed part 9 
regulatory text set forth in this document specifies only the full name 
``Champlain Valley of New York'' as a term of viticultural significance 
for purposes of part 4 of the TTB regulations.

Public Participation

Comments Invited

    TTB invites comments from interested members of the public on 
whether it should establish the proposed viticultural area. TTB is also 
interested in receiving comments on the sufficiency and accuracy of the 
name, boundary, soils, climate, and other required information 
submitted in support of the petition. Please provide any available 
specific information in support of your comments.
    Because of the potential impact of the establishment of the 
proposed Champlain Valley of New York AVA on wine labels that include 
the term ``Champlain Valley of New York'' as discussed above under 
Impact on Current Wine Labels, TTB is particularly interested in 
comments regarding whether there will be a conflict between the 
proposed area name and currently used brand names. If a commenter 
believes that a conflict will arise, the comment should describe the 
nature of that conflict, including any anticipated negative economic 
impact that approval of the proposed viticultural area will have on an 
existing viticultural enterprise. TTB is also interested in receiving 
suggestions for ways to avoid conflicts, for example, by adopting a 
modified or different name for the viticultural area.

Submitting Comments

    You may submit comments on this notice by using one of the 
following three methods:
    <bullet> Federal e-Rulemaking Portal: You may send comments via the 
online comment form posted with this notice within Docket No. TTB-2015-
0010 on ``<a href="http://Regulations.gov">Regulations.gov</a>,'' the Federal e-rulemaking portal, at <a href="http://www.regulations.gov">http://www.regulations.gov</a>. A direct link to that docket is available under 
Notice No. 154 on the TTB Web site at <a href="http://www.ttb.gov/wine/wine-rulemaking.shtml">http://www.ttb.gov/wine/wine-rulemaking.shtml</a>. Supplemental files may be attached to comments 
submitted via <a href="http://Regulations.gov">Regulations.gov</a>. For complete instructions on how to use 
<a href="http://Regulations.gov">Regulations.gov</a>, visit the site and click on the ``Help'' tab.
    <bullet> U.S. Mail: You may send comments via postal mail to the 
Director, Regulations and Rulings Division, Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and 
Trade Bureau, 1310 G Street NW., Box 12, Washington, DC 20005.
    <bullet> Hand Delivery/Courier: You may hand-carry your comments or 
have them hand-carried to the Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau, 
1310 G Street NW., Suite 400, Washington, DC 20005. Please submit your comments by the closing date shown above in this 
notice. Your comments must reference Notice No. 154 and include your 
name and mailing address. Your comments also must be made in English, 
be legible, and be written in language acceptable for public 
disclosure. TTB does not acknowledge receipt of comments, and TTB 
considers all comments as originals.
    In your comment, please clearly indicate if you are commenting on 
your own behalf or on behalf of an association, business, or other 
entity. If you are commenting on behalf of an entity, your comment must 
include the entity's name, as well as your name and position title. If 
you comment via <a href="http://Regulations.gov">Regulations.gov</a>, please enter the entity's name in the 
``Organization'' blank of the online comment form. If you comment via 
postal mail or hand delivery/courier, please submit your entity's 
comment on letterhead.
    You may also write to the Administrator before the comment closing 
date to ask for a public hearing. The Administrator reserves the right 
to determine whether to hold a public hearing.

Confidentiality

    All submitted comments and attachments are part of the public 
record and subject to disclosure. Do not enclose any material in your 
comments that you consider to be confidential or inappropriate for 
public disclosure.

Public Disclosure

    TTB will post, and you may view, copies of this notice, selected 
supporting materials, and any online or mailed comments received about 
this proposal within Docket No. TTB-2015-0010 on the Federal e-
rulemaking portal, <a href="http://Regulations.gov">Regulations.gov</a>, at <a href="http://www.regulations.gov">http://www.regulations.gov</a>. A 
direct link to that docket is available on the TTB Web site at <a href="http://www.ttb.gov/wine/wine-rulemaking.shtml">http://www.ttb.gov/wine/wine-rulemaking.shtml</a> under Notice No. 154. You may 
also reach the relevant docket through the <a href="http://Regulations.gov">Regulations.gov</a> search page 
at <a href="http://www.regulations.gov">http://www.regulations.gov</a>. For information on how to use 
<a href="http://Regulations.gov">Regulations.gov</a>, click on the site's ``Help'' tab.
    All posted comments will display the commenter's name, organization 
(if any), city, and State, and, in the case of mailed comments, all 
address information, including email addresses. TTB may omit voluminous 
attachments or material that the Bureau considers unsuitable for 
posting.
    You may also view copies of this notice, all related petitions, 
maps and other supporting materials, and any electronic or mailed 
comments that TTB receives about this proposal by appointment at the 
TTB Information Resource Center, 1310 G Street NW., Washington, DC 
20005. You may also obtain copies at 20 cents per 8.5- x 11-inch page. 
Please note that TTB is unable to provide copies of USGS maps or other 
similarly-sized documents that may be included as part of the AVA 
petition. Contact TTB's information specialist at the above address or 
by telephone at 202-453-2270 to schedule an appointment or to request 
copies of comments or other materials.

Regulatory Flexibility Act

    TTB certifies that this proposed regulation, if adopted, would not 
have a significant economic impact on a substantial number of small 
entities. The proposed regulation imposes no new reporting, 
recordkeeping, or other administrative requirement. Any benefit derived 
from the use of a viticultural area name would be the result of a 
proprietor's efforts and consumer acceptance of wines from that area. 
Therefore, no regulatory flexibility analysis is required.

Executive Order 12866

    It has been determined that this proposed rule is not a significant 
regulatory action as defined by Executive Order 12866 of September 30, 
1993. Therefore, no regulatory assessment is required.

Drafting Information

    Karen A. Thornton of the Regulations and Rulings Division drafted 
this proposed rule.

List of Subjects in 27 CFR Part 9

    Wine.

    For the reasons discussed in the preamble, TTB proposes to amend 
title 27, chapter I, part 9, Code of Federal Regulations, as follows:

PART 9--AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS

0
1. The authority citation for part 9 continues to read as follows:

    Authority: 27 U.S.C. 205.

Subpart C--Approved American Viticultural Areas

0
2. Subpart C is amended by adding Sec.  9.2__to read as follows:


Sec.  9.  Champlain Valley of New York.

    (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this 
section is ``Champlain Valley of New York''. For purposes of part 4 of 
this chapter, ``Champlain Valley of New York'' is a term of 
viticultural significance.
    (b) Approved maps. The two United States Geological Survey (USGS) 
1:100,000 scale topographic maps used to determine the boundary of the 
Champlain Valley of New York viticultural area are titled:
    (1) Lake Champlain, N.Y.; VT.; N.H.; U.S.; CAN., 1962; revised 
(U.S. area) 1972; and
    (2) Glens Falls, N.Y.; VT.; N.H., 1956; revised 1972.
    (c) Boundary. The Champlain Valley of New York viticultural area is 
located in Clinton and Essex Counties, New York. The boundary of the 
Champlain Valley of New York viticultural area is as described below:
    (1) The beginning point is found on the Lake Champlain map at the 
intersection of the western shore of Lake Champlain and the U.S.-Canada 
border, just north of the town of Rouses Point.
    (2) From the beginning point, proceed south along the western shore 
of Lake Champlain approximately 109.4 miles, crossing onto the Glens 
Falls map, to a road marked on the map as State Route 73 (now known as 
State Route 74) and known locally as Fort Ti Road, at the Fort 
Ticonderoga-Larrabees Point Ferry landing; then
    (3) Proceed west along State Route 73 (State Route 74/Fort Ti Road) 
approximately 1.6 miles to State Route 22; then
    (4) Proceed north along State Route 22 approximately 21 miles, 
crossing onto the Lake Champlain map and passing through the town of 
Port Henry, to an unnamed light-duty road known locally as County Road 
44 (Stevenson Road); then
    (5) Proceed north along County Road 44 (Stevenson Road) 
approximately 5.8 miles to a railroad track; then
    (6) Proceed northerly along the railroad track approximately 1.6 
miles to State Route 9N, west of the town of Westport; then
    (7) Proceed westerly along State Route 9N approximately 4.1 miles 
to Interstate 87; then
    (8) Proceed north along Interstate 87 approximately 21 miles to the 
Ausable River, southwest of the town of Keeseville; then
    (9) Proceed west (upstream) along the Ausable River approximately 6 
miles to a bridge connecting two unnamed light-duty roads known locally 
as Burke Road and Lower Road in the town of Clintonville, and proceed 
north along the bridge to Lower Road; then
    (10) Proceed west along Lower Road approximately 0.6 mile to State 
Route 9N; then
    (11) Proceed west along State Route 9N approximately 0.8 mile to an 
unnamed light-duty road known locally as County Route 39 (Clintonville Road); then
    (12) Proceed north along County Route 39 (Clintonville Road) 
approximately 1.5 miles to the second crossing of the Little Ausable 
River, west of Cook Mountain; then
    (13) Proceed northeast along the Little Ausable River approximately 
3.5 miles to the confluence of the river with Furnace Brook, near the 
town of Harkness; then
    (14) Proceed west along Furnace Brook approximately 0.17 mile to an 
unnamed light-duty road known locally as County Route 40 (Calkins 
Road); then
    (15) Proceed north along County Route 40 (Calkins Road) 
approximately 5.8 miles to an unnamed light-duty road known locally as 
County Route 35 (Peasleeville Road), south of an unnamed creek known 
locally as Arnold Brook; then
    (16) Proceed west along County Route 35 (Peasleeville Road) 
approximately 0.1 mile to an unnamed light-duty road known locally as 
Connors Road; then
    (17) Proceed north along Connors Road approximately 2.1 miles, 
crossing the Salmon River, to an unnamed light-duty road known locally 
as County Route 33 (Norrisville Road); then
    (18) Proceed west along County Route 33 (Norrisville Road) 
approximately 1.2 miles to an unnamed light-duty road known locally as 
Shingle Street; then
    (19) Proceed north along Shingle Street approximately 4 miles to an 
unnamed light-duty road known locally as County Route 31 (Rabideau 
Street); then
    (20) Proceed west along County Route 31 (Rabideau Street) 
approximately 0.4 mile to an unnamed light-duty road known locally as 
Goddeau Street; then
    (21) Proceed north along Goddeau Street approximately 0.9 mile, 
crossing the Saranac River, to State Route 3 just east of the town of 
Cadyville; then
    (22) Proceed east along State Route 3 approximately 0.5 mile to an 
unnamed light-duty road known locally as Akey Road; then
    (23) Proceed north on Akey Road approximately 0.2 mile to State 
Route 374; then
    (24) Proceed east along State Route 374 approximately 3.6 miles to 
State Route 190, also known locally as Military Turnpike; then
    (25) Proceed northwest along State Route 190 (Military Turnpike) 
approximately 15.2 miles to an unnamed light-duty road just east of 
Park Brook known locally as County Route 12 (Alder Bend Road), 
northwest of Miner Lake State Park; then
    (26) Proceed north along County Route 12 (Alder Bend Road) 
approximately 3 miles to U.S. Highway 11; then
    (27) Proceed west along U.S. Highway 11 approximately 1.7 miles to 
an unnamed light-duty road known locally as County Route 10 (Cannon 
Corners Road); then
    (28) Proceed north along County Route 10 (Cannon Corners Road) 
approximately 6 miles to the U.S.-Canada border; then
    (29) Proceed east along the U.S.-Canada border approximately 19.8 
miles, returning to the beginning point.

    Dated: June 24, 2015.
John J. Manfreda,
Administrator.
[FR Doc. 2015-16343 Filed 7-1-15; 8:45 am]
 BILLING CODE 4810-31-P


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Citation: 80 FR 38147
 

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